TOP SEARCH TERMS
CANCEL
TOP SEARCH TERMS

Posts Tagged ‘vinyl’

Finally, MakerBotting A Melody!

This is the coolest thing in the world right now.

Remember those Fisher Price record players that pumped out jams like Mary Had A Little Lamb and, I dunno, the theme from Babar? They’re back, and ready for MakerBotting!

Instructables author fred27 has published a nice set of steps for producing custom records for these machines on a CNC mill. There is also an app for generating the music. It looks fairly simple, just drop in notes.

Here’s the thing: this was all done on a mill, but as Gizmodo points out, this is prime territory for a 3D printer like a MakerBot. Of course, longtime MakerBot community members will remember some of the serious research we have already done into 3D printable vinyl…

I read through the Instructable and noticed this bit of caution:

we will end up creating plastic pins around 1mm in size that trigger the music box hidden in the record player’s arm. I was worried about whether the extruded plastic technique used by most printers would give it the required strength.

 

Looking at the picture above, I feel confident a MakerBot could make these nubs more than strong enough to resist the music box mechanism. I’d suggest making this with higher infill settings to be sure.

But how to MakerBot this?

The gcode for milling these suckers is available from fred27, and the process would need to be converted. The Instructable provides the design file for the blank disc itself, but in order to be used with a MakerBot, you’d need the entire model with the music added in.

Fred27 says that in order to mill the disc at one time, you should use the gcode file marked “…(Full).nc”.

Aha! Maybe that’s the answer. If that gcode for the entire record, musical nubs included, can be converted back into a model, then that model can be sliced to provide appropriate instructions for the MakerBot.

This is the perfect opportunity to put a modern spin on an old toy, and Fred plans to submit it to the Make It Real Challenge.

So what tunes do you remember from these records, and which custom tunes would you make?

 

Tagged with , , , , , 7 comments
 

phonograph adapter for 45′s by nmartin

45_adapter_display_large

Ok, we’ve covered something like this before.  However, Thingiverse user nmartin has re-created a classic here.  You don’t have to play too many records before you see one of these — the cheap, ubiquitous adapters that you’ll still find in 45rpm (7″ for the hipsters) records to this day.  But now, with your MakerBot, you can print one out for every single 7″ record you have!

This is either immensely exciting to you, or you’ve already stopped reading.

Error - could not find Thing 10475.

Tagged with , , , , Leave a comment
 

7-inch vinyl centering tool by vinyl (and a Thingiverse milestone!)

7" adapter!

Ok, we haven’t actually been able to deliver fully printable vinyl records, but this is still pretty cool for the analog audiophiles.  How many times have you been watching your favorite single-spinning DJ dropping their 7-inchers on fancy machined-aluminum adapters, and said “man, those are cool?”

Well, this is a pretty stylish DIY option, as you can see.  Cheers to thingiverse user vinyl for working on this!

Also notice — Thingiverse numbers have passed 10,000!  Next up: 100,000.  Thanks everybody and keep modeling!

Error - could not find Thing 10175.
Tagged with , 2 comments
 

MakerBot Introduces 3D Printable Vinyl Records

After months of intensive research and development, MakerBot Industries is proud to announce a newly realized capacity of the MakerBot Thing-O-Matic 3D Printer- the ability to print listenable vinyl records from the desktop.

“The process of transcribing an audio file into a vinyl record is so simple, anyone can do it.” Said Chief Audio Engineer Isaac Dietz. “Right now, I’m using the Automated Build Platform to rip my entire MP3 collection to individual records!”

“It’s an exciting innovation for MakerBot, as we all grew up listening to vinyl. We all wish that more records were available with the latest hits,” said Audio R&D Associate Marisol Murphy. “I can never get enough Justin Bieber or Rebecca Black until I listened to them on my turntable.”

The process utilizes the MakerBot 96khz AudioNozzle™ technology to print audio waveforms in real time. Using the MakerBot Generation 4 Electronics microstepping capacity, the AudioNozzle™ modulates the amount of plastic deposited to create a high-fidelity waveform. The results often surpass the dynamic range of 24-bit recordings and can contain frequencies up to 57khz — even higher than the Nyquist frequency for 96khz digital recording. You can even record directly to your 3D Printer by attaching a microphone to your computer, and singing into it.

Says Ethan Hartman, Vice President of Audio Operations: “MakerBot’s pioneering spirit has always hearkened back to early inventors like Thomas Edison. We are honored to be able to re-invent the audio record for the personal manufacturing space in the burgeoning 20-teens.”

Pre-orders for the 96khz AudioNozzle™ will be available shortly.

MakerBot 3D Printed Vinyl Records can be downloaded from Thingiverse here.

Tagged with , , , , , , , , , 19 comments
 
 
Chat
What can we help you with today?
I want to chat with Sales.
I have a question about an existing order.
I have a technical question about my device.
Open Support Case
Existing Orders
For faster service, enter your order number
(found in your confirmation e-mail)
Skip
Submit