TOP SEARCH TERMS
CANCEL
TOP SEARCH TERMS
Subtotal:

Reorder

Project Shellter: Can the MakerBot Community Save Hermit Crabs?

Photo credit

Update:

There seems to be a some misunderstandings about the project. Here are some clarifications:

  • The final shell material has yet to be determined; plastic is being used for prototypes
  • No printed shells have been distributed in the wild
  • The goal is to create a printable hermit crab shell for domestic use thus reducing harvesting of natural shells

 

Hermit crabs don’t make their own shells. They scavenge their homes. And now, hermit crabs are facing a housing shortage as the worldwide shell supply is decreasing. With a shell shortage, hermit crabs around the world are being forced to stick their butts into bottles, shotgun shells, and anything else they can find. This is not acceptable. As a community, we can reach out to this vulnerable species and offer our digital design skills and 3D printing capabilities and give hermit crabs another option: 3D printed shells.

Miles Lightwood, AKA TeamTeamUSA, is doing exactly that as an artist in residence here at MakerBot. His big project is Project Shellter, to provide 3D printed shells for hermit crabs the world over. We are inviting all MakerBot Operators and digital designers on Thingiverse to design shells and participate in SCIENCE!

We’ve set up a crab habitat, a crabitat, here at the Botcave in Brooklyn and Miles is setting up a crabitat in Los Angeles. We need help from the community to design shells so we can print them out and see if the hermit crabs like them. Can you design a shell that hermit crabs will like? We’ll print them out here at the botcave, put them in the crabitats and see which designs the hermit crabs will move into. Will they like ABS or PLA? Will they prefer one color over another? Will they even consider a 3D printed shell? We won’t know until we use empirical science and test it out. If you participate in the project, use the hashtag #SHELLTER on twitter so that we can all track what’s going on. You can follow Project Shellter on Facebook too!

This is a new frontier of crowdsourced science. Please design shells that you think a hermit crab would like and upload them to thingiverse and tag them with “SHELLTER.” Miles will be posting a summary of his research on design parameters for hermit crab shells next. If you design them, together we’ll do science and find a way to solve the hermit crab housing problem.

Got feedback or ideas? Drop a note in the comments.


Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , 53 comments
 

53 Comments so far

  • Tim
    October 18, 2011 at 1:37 pm
     

    This is awesome!

     
  • emily
    October 18, 2011 at 1:54 pm
     

    Love this concept, but don’t love the environmental implications. More plastic in the bottom of our oceans is a bad deal. If it can be made from a material that’s more biodegradable, the same or similar composition of what an original shell is made of, or say something that you can grow in your back yard, I would be inclined to participate, but I would love to see a new material used for these sorts of projects.

    I also think that conservation can be fairly problematic at times … with 99% of the species on earth already being extinct, and with the amount of change that our atmosphere is seeing right now, it seems logical to say that a crucial part of evolution is extinction and re-birth of certain species … I do think it’s important to test out these ideas, but I just hope that research is being done on what the effects of these sorts of projects could do to our ecosystem.

    I think it’s a fun idea, though. <3's!

     
  • Geo
    October 18, 2011 at 5:06 pm
     

    If environmental waste is an issue, then PLA (poly[lactic] acid) would be the way to go, the material over time is biodegradable. Then again, that would conflict with the goal of making shells that would last for (hermit crab) generations, so more hermit crabs can continue to use the shell(s).

    If you would like to learn more about PLA, here is the wiki…
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polylactic_acid

    A growing number of 3D printing enthusiasts love to use PLA, but it also difficult to use. All discoveries and implications will rise during the course of this project, or dare I say… Challenge! ^_^ So we will see what is best for out little crab friends.

    Any good intention is not a wasted effort.

     
  • 3D printing shells for hermit crabs « Ponoko – Blog
    October 19, 2011 at 9:42 am
     

    […] tops and shotgun shells. As part of his artist-in-residency with MakerBot, Lightwood is working on Project Shellter, a project to provide better homes for these homeless crabs. Lightwood and Makerbot have set up […]

     
  • 3D printed hermit crab shells
    October 19, 2011 at 12:29 pm
     

    […] Project Shellter: Can the MakerBot Community Save Hermit Crabs? « MakerBot Industries Project Shellter: Can the MakerBot Community Save Hermit Crabs? Posted by Bre Pettis on Tuesday, October 18, 2011 in Hermit Crab Project Shellter. Hermit crabs don't make their own shells. They sc… […]

     
  • Benbo231
    October 20, 2011 at 6:44 am
     

    It all depends on the infill, doesn’t it? We don’t want these crabs floating on top of the waves, due to the skimpy 20% infill in their shells.

    Shotgun SHELLS… LOL.

     
  • Will 3D Printers Become the New PCs? | Innovations
    October 20, 2011 at 3:45 pm
     

    […] to dabble in printer sculpting. And it’s the impetus behind a new crowdsourced science called Project Shellter, where it’s asking people to come up with a design for a shell hermit crabs can use for […]

     
  • Shane Graber
    October 21, 2011 at 8:49 am
     

    You might take a look @ this article for some inspiration on shell design:

    http://www.advancedaquarist.com/blog/calling-all-hermit-crab-exhibitionists-hand-blown-glass-shells

    If that shell you’re printing is sectioned off like the nautilus shell model (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:9177) it might cause problems. I’d suggest removing the internal section “walls” and see what that does.

     
  • Matt
    October 21, 2011 at 10:52 am
     

    I love the sound of the idea, especially as I have a hard time finding shells big enough for my little lady. However, what’s to keep the crabs from eating the printed shells? Hermit crabs regularly get sick from eating the paint from painted shells, and their claws are unbelievably powerful, so they can break nearly anything into bite-sized pieces. With normal shells, that’s not an issue, since any little chips they tear off can be digested, and actually act as a good calcium source. With plastics, I feel like they’ll easily tear off chunks and fill up on not-so-great chemicals.

    And yes, I know PLA is biodegradable (and biocompatible for mammalian implants, IIRC), but hermit crabs have a completely different biochemistry than most creatures you’re used to. For instance, they don’t have hemoglobin, they have hemocyanin, which uses copper instead of iron to bring oxygen to the cells, and they have specialized gills they have to water regularly. If that’s not alien enough, I’ve heard that hemocyanin makes blood turn blue when exposed to the air!

    That said, shells printed from something they’re not likely to eat (or OK to eat) would be awesome. Perhaps some kind of cement-like substance from calcium carbonate, since that’s what shells are (mostly) made of anyways?

     
  • Joe User
    October 23, 2011 at 11:46 am
     

    Please, please find some way to do this that doesn’t involve plastic.

    Have you been to any Oregon beaches lately ? If you get down on your knees and look into the sand, there is a homogenous mix of tiny, pulverized plastic particles – everywhere.

    Good people are picking up plastic junk off of the beaches every day in a vain attempt to counteract the film of garbage that is now coating nearly every surface of the globe. Don’t add to this problem.

     
  • TeamTeamUSA
    October 23, 2011 at 2:20 pm
     

    Thanks for the interest and comments.

    Some clarifications:

    * The final shell material has yet to be determined

    * No printed shells have been distributed in the wild

    * The goal is to create a printable hermit crab shell for domestic use, thus reducing harvesting of natural shells.

    More info coming shortly.

     
  • Neal
    October 23, 2011 at 5:45 pm
     

    TeamTeamUSA, the comments about the story on Shareable.net, Slashdot (made the homepage), and Fark are mostly negative. There are hundreds of comments across these sites. You’d probably do well to post clarifications on these sites too.

     
  • Velu
    October 24, 2011 at 1:45 am
     

    This is going to sound odd, but bear with me for a second.

    If your goal is to alleviate human harvesting of shells for pets, Keep in mind the need to target the person who’s going to choose between a printed shell and a “natural” one. ie percieved as better for your pet. Cheaper isn’t going to do it for someone who cares.

    Either the final material will have to be a perfect alternative of a real shell’s.

    or

    If you’re printing them anyways. I’d suggest trying to make functional themed shells ( functional being the main focus). Steampunk, moving house, moving castle, etc …

    Simple reason, all other factors being equal, pet owners will probably lean towards a natural shell. That glassblown shell is a great example of something that has the potential to work.

    Also,

    Perhaps it might be worth looking at how shells are actually formed in nature. Taking a page from medical science, instead printing a shell, printing a frame onto which actual shell material could naturally accumulate might also be an interesting avenue of exploration.

     
  • Mr R
    October 24, 2011 at 11:19 am
     

    Are there any tips/remarks/research on what would make a good home/shell for the crabs? Should there be a certain hole-size to internal-space ratio (knowing the design items can be scaled), should they have a certain shape inside, should they be a minimum/maximum weight?

    I got the picture that they wouldn’t have to look like shells on the outside (don’t know about the inside), so you could have pictures/words/the makerbot ‘m’ on the outside. But all I’ve seen is shell looking designs.

     
  • Hermit Crabs Need You To 3-D Print New Shells For Them | clockhard.com
    October 24, 2011 at 5:29 pm
     

    […] 3-D Print New Shells For Them Posted on October 24, 2011 by admin3-D Printed Hermit Crab Shells via MakerbotOr so says MakerbotEven hermit crabs aren't immune to swings in their own ecological economies. A […]

     
  • Eliot
    October 24, 2011 at 6:01 pm
     

    Will you be looking at Elizabeth Demaray’s work from 2004? http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/13/demaray.php

     
  • nitesky
    October 24, 2011 at 10:16 pm
     

    Think this is a great idea, thanks for caring for crabs! and here are some comments:

    – Hermit crabs do regularly ingest parts of their shells. So if there is anyway they could be made of some calcium source like recycled eggshells or clamshells, that could be safely ingested, that would be much better for the crabs. Such shells could also be used in the real marine environment and not cause pollution. Also natural shells are porous and allow transfer of oxygen and moisture. It would be much healthier if any created shells had this ability.

    – Hermit crabs in the pet trade have enough problems. Many many of them die just from the capturing process and inadequate conditions in stores and homes. PLEASE dont consider putting them into ‘fancy’ or decorative shells of weird shapes or designs. (like castles or houses) Many more captive crabs will likely just die from this as they are really susceptible to stress.

    – I’m not sure focusing on creating shells for the pet trade is the best use of this technology. I think its good to keep in mind that there is way more harvesting of shells for the craft and home decorating market. Huge bags of natural shells are sold at craft stores for extremely cheap. I’m sure this is taking far more shells out of the wild than the hermit crab trade. Maybe these created shells can also be marketed for home decorating to ease up the market on natural shells.

    – When crabs are captured they bring their shells with them. And they will likely need only a handful of additional shells during their captivity. These captive crabs are in need of natural, real shells as their chances of surviving in captivity is already very low. I feel it’s the crabs in the wild who cannot find shells anywhere and are using trash who need the help of supplementary shells like this. Also, if less crabs can survive in the wild, less crabs will be available for the pet trade anyway, but they will still be harvested, and the whole species could eventually totally collapse.

    – I would love to see these shells developed in an edible, environmentally friendly material and used to supplement natural environments where pollution/overharvesting is hurting wild crab populations. To make it financially viable they could be marketed in the craft/decorating market.

    Thanks very much for caring for hermit crabs!

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs | TechCrunch
    October 25, 2011 at 5:00 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • facebook online » And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs
    October 25, 2011 at 6:04 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • Zero to Maker: Adventures in 3D Scanning | Photography Blog | South | Africa
    October 25, 2011 at 6:30 pm
     

    […] until I read a short entry on the MakerBot blog that everything came full-circle: Project Shellter: Can MakerBot’s Save the Hermit Crab Community. The story profiles Miles Lightwood, MakerBot’s artist in residence, as he and the team set […]

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs - The Review Blog
    October 25, 2011 at 7:21 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • worldnew » And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs
    October 25, 2011 at 8:17 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • ghambas [dot] net
    October 25, 2011 at 10:47 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs | Here I Talk Only About Games & Tech
    October 25, 2011 at 11:03 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs | My Blog
    October 25, 2011 at 11:51 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs | Startup Help
    October 26, 2011 at 3:00 am
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • lauraa
    October 26, 2011 at 5:21 pm
     

    will u need test crabitats for the different shells as they are produced?

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs | the Art of Travel Trailer
    October 26, 2011 at 8:36 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • Jarrard
    October 26, 2011 at 10:37 pm
     

    Hello; good idea however I’m sure there is more 3D print material out there. I’m no genious and I’m sure you guys have considered glass composites etc.. but here is one example of 3D printing for bone substitutes, http://www.mendeley.com/research/3d-printing-of-bone-substitute-implants-using-calcium-phosphate-and-bioactive-glasses/

    This compoint they use may be a option, or lead to ideas in finding similar solutions. (perhaps a cheap plaster/cement option can be thought up, just use non-leechable glues or the poor buggers might die of toxic shock)

     
  • Saving Hermit Crabs With 3d Shells @PSFK
    October 27, 2011 at 11:39 am
     

    […] Project Shelter is working to address the shortage of shells in order to help hermit crabs by making three-dimensional shells via digital design. Due to the shortage, hermit crabs have been found using bottles, shotgun shells, and other pieces of garbage. The Markerbot community has yet to determine what material will be used, although plastic has so far been used for prototypes. Their aim is to provide shells for domestic hermit crabs in order to free up shells in the wild. […]

     
  • Project Shellter, 3D Printing Shells to Ease Hermit Crab Shell Shortage
    October 28, 2011 at 1:41 pm
     

    […] Project Shellter is a MakerBot community initiative by Miles Lightwood to design and 3D print shells for pet hermit crabs, who like their wild relatives, are facing a global shortage of donor shells. Lightwood hopes the man-made shells will stop the practice of removing shells from the wild for use by pet hermit crabs. […]

     
  • Daethian
    October 28, 2011 at 2:05 pm
     

    Feel free to approach our community of hermit crab owners to get their input and advice on your project. Feedback from hermit crab owners seems crucial to the success of the project. I’m sure you will be able to find some willing volunteers to test out the shells as well, including myself.

    Crabstreetjournal.com

     
  • tracey
    October 28, 2011 at 2:21 pm
     

    i think this is a fantastic idea! i don’t own a hermit crab, but would love to support the project in some way. hooray for NOT harvesting from the wild. perhaps there can be an exchange program where owners return the natural shells so they can be returned to the wild?

     
  • Dan
    October 29, 2011 at 3:02 pm
     

    3 comment:
    We used to live in the Virgin Islands. We had a friend who used baby food bottles to store nuts, bolts, etc. ( you never throw anything away in the islands).
    One day he noticed his supply of empty bottles disappearing. He looked behind his shed and saw scores of little hermit crabs scampeing away with bottles attached.
    A preferred design ?

    If you need a supply of crabs. We noticed that when we finished a mango and threw the seed off the deck, within minutes it appeared that the ground for 360 degrees for yards around the seed was moving as scores of hermit crabs were headed for a tasty treat. A preferred food ?

    Have you looked at chitin/chitosan as a material. I don’t know if it can be used as a structural material in your application, but it is a natural structural material available for industrial applications.

     
  • 3d printing new homes for hermit crabs » BuildLounge
    October 30, 2011 at 10:24 am
     

    […] bit of a chore. He’s pretty big for a hermit crab. If I had a 3d printer handy, I could just print one the correct size. Of course if I made them, they would probably be adorned with various attachments, and/or shaped […]

     
  • 3D Printing Making A Shellter Home | CBrajkovich Ramblings
    October 30, 2011 at 12:03 pm
     

    […] just saw this amazingly hopeful use for a 3D printer: making shellters for homeless hermit crabs. Makerbot is working with Miles Lightwood of Team Team USA on a crowd-sourcing project called Project […]

     
  • Do-Gooders Create 3-D Printed Shells To Save Hermit Crabs | t3knoDorKs
    October 31, 2011 at 10:10 pm
     

    […] CAD software, could we have iterated a pattern that would have finished a trick? That’s what Project Shellter is all about: regulating DIY 3-D printers and crowdsourced design to offer domestic cenobite crabs […]

     
  • kross media » Do-Gooders Create 3-D Printed Shells To Save Hermit Crabs
    November 1, 2011 at 4:21 am
     

    […] some CAD software, could I have iterated a design that would have done the trick? That’s what Project Shellter is all about: using DIY 3-D printers and crowdsourced design to offer domestic hermit crabs a wider […]

     
  • MakerBot’s Bre Pettis Talks Project Shellter | EarthTechling
    November 1, 2011 at 5:31 pm
     

    […] committed makers have set out to do some good by reversing the hermit crab housing shortage through Project Shellter.image via TxchnologistTxchnologist visited MakerBot’s Brooklyn headquarters (AKA the BotCave) a […]

     
  • - Kristen Baumlier
    November 3, 2011 at 11:33 am
     

    […] Project Shelter […]

     
  • And Makerbot Said: Let There Be 3D-Printed Shells For Pet Hermit Crabs « Online Contact Management « Online Contact Management
    November 8, 2011 at 11:29 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • wodosorel
    November 14, 2011 at 3:32 pm
     

    You guys have to come and join over at the Hermit Crab Association and tell us all more about it!! I would be first in line to try them out on my 36 coenobita clypeatus and my 9 coenobita compressus if you ever get to the point where you want to trial them among different crabs and tank set-ups. :) I think you’d find several serious hermit crab keepers who would be willing to give them a chance! (Although I’m not sure if any of us have a 3D printer that we could join in with.)

    The community has long known about the shell shortages going on, and I think many of us wish there were better, ecologically-friendly options that we could employ in captivity that weren’t taking resources away from their wild brethren. While shell collecting for any reason has caused the shortages, I think hermit crab keepers are the only ones keep boxes of hundreds of shells for their ever so picky crabs. We realize we’re partially responsible, but there are still no good options for keeping our hermit crabs alive and healthy without doing so.

    A note about preferred shell types that’s been gleaned from hundreds of owners:

    For clypeatus, the shell that is chosen over and over again are Tapestry Turbos (turbo petholatus). It has an opening to length ratio of almost a perfect 1:2, and is thick and sturdy. Even though it’s not part of it’s natural range, when offered in captivity the crabs will often immediately change over.

    Compressus are more picky and even in captivity will often wear broken and poorly fitting shells rather than change. They employ some means of actually gutting out and removing the central sprial, and seem to seek other shells that are modified in this way. If there was any way to design a Black Nerite (nerita melanotragus) that has been altered and then enlarged, I’m sure you’d have a major hit on your hands! Nerites will only fit this species to about a 1/2 inch opening, and beyond that the crabs must choose a different type of shell. Not all are willing to do so until they’ve potentially run into health problems from staying in a too-small shell for too long.

    This is just so amazingly cool. :) Wish you all the best of luck with it!!

     
  • Miles
    Miles
    November 23, 2011 at 3:26 am
     

    Thank you to everyone who took time to comment, your views both positive and negative were presented in a thoughtful and constructive way.

    More info on the way…

    Follow, share and contribute to help save hermit crabs by keeping natural shells in the wild!

    projectshellter.com
    bit.ly/ProjectShellter
    bit.ly/ProjectShellterShells
    bit.ly/ProjectShellterVideos
    twitter.com/ProjectShellter
    twitter.com/ShellterWest
    twitter.com/ShellterEast

    Go!

     
  • Conchas artificiales para paguroideos » No Puedo Creer
    November 26, 2011 at 6:52 am
     

    […] debido a la ausencia de conchas de moluscos en las que refugiarse. Por eso, Makerbot ha comenzado el Proyecto Shellter, en el que fabricarán con impresoras 3D conchas artificiales para evitar la desaparición de estos […]

     
  • Gusci artificiali per i paguri con la stampante 3D « AdbView
    December 12, 2011 at 8:22 am
     

    […] Marketbot Industries, un’azienda all’avanguardia nel settore delle stampanti 3D, ha inventato un guscio artificiale per sopperire alla carenza di abitazioni in fondo al mare: tutto da vedere, certo, perché non esiste alcuna garanzia che ai paguri piaccia il frutto dell’ingegno umano, ma l’iniziativa resta lodevole. […]

     
  • AND MAKERBOT SAID: LET THERE BE 3D-PRINTED SHELLS FOR PET HERMIT CRABS » MAKERBOT, SHELLTER, PROJECT, MANY, ALSO, FURTHERMORE » TECH MAGAZINE
    December 16, 2011 at 12:13 pm
     

    […] is one of the most interesting applications of the technology I’ve seen. The project aims to produce artificial shells for hermit crabs using a MakerBot, which would otherwise have to be supplied by harvesting spare shells from the […]

     
  • 3D-printed Shells for homeless Crabs - Nerdcore
    January 18, 2012 at 1:46 pm
     

    […] Project Shellter: Can the MakerBot Community Save Hermit Crabs? (via PopSci) […]

     
  • Tercer Grado: Materializador Automático de Sueños - Esceptica
    January 27, 2012 at 4:32 am
     

    […] los he apantallado todavía? Qué les parece imprimir conchas para cangrejos ermitaños (el suministro de conchas a nivel mundial está decayendo, haciendo que […]

     
  •  
  • Adam
    March 14, 2012 at 3:51 am
     

    Hi all, love the idea of 3D Printing shells. I embarked on a similar project and have 3D modelled and 3D Printed the Nautilus shell in a bid to replicate the original and hopefully reduce the farming of the real thing (http://www.sculpteo.com/en/s/inner_leaf/main). If you are interested I am happy to model some ideas for you or give you any feedback you may want with 3D Printing as my company INNER | LEAF is, among other things, a 3D Printing Consultancy.

    Have you thought about ceramic materials, full recycled and recyclable? Check out (http://www.shapeways.com/materials). Like much of the comments, I’d be keen to keep plastics out of the sea if at all possible, unless they are a combined Rubber/Plastic composite that is biodegradable.

     
  • Hermit Crabs Need You To 3-D Print New Shells For Them « Science Technology Informer
    March 28, 2012 at 12:42 am
     

    […] Makerbot isn’t having it. Stepping in to bring shelter to the shell-less, Makerbot has launched Project Shellter along with artist in residence Miles Lightwood to crowdsource new shell designs that can be […]

     
  • Rafael
    April 29, 2013 at 2:38 pm
     

    There are some 3D objects in http://www.digimorph.org, with natural shapes. I think it’s interesting for the project.

    Amazing!

    Best.

     
  • Daniel
    September 28, 2013 at 2:11 am
     

    Hi there,

    Mt name is Daniel Garcia and I am a teacher at a private secondary college from Victoria, Australia – Braemar College.

    I will be running a 3D course next week that will run for a term (about 8 80min lessons).

    I was wanting my students to design and print 3d hermit crab shells for your Project Shelter project.

    I can’t seem to find any updated details of the project, you project shelter blog seems to have no been updated for a while.

    Is there anyone I can talk to about this project and how we could help, would love to give my students some exposure.

    Thanks.
    -D.

     
 

Leave your comment

 
 
 

xhtml: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

 
 

12 months special financing on new
MakerBot 3D printer hardware purchases
with Dell Preferred Account on Dell.com.


Limited-time offer for qualified customers.
Offer Details

12 months special financing on new MakerBot 3D printer hardware purchases is a no interest if paid in full by November, 2015 financing promotion. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full by your payment due date in November, 2015 or if you make a late payment. Minimum monthly payments are required during the promotional period. If not paid by end of promotional period, account balance and new purchases will be subject to the Standard APR rates, which range from 19.99% - 29.99% variable APR, as of 8/30/2014, depending on creditworthiness. Offers subject to credit approval and may be changed without notice.

Dell Preferred Account offered to U.S. residents by WebBank, who determines qualifications for and terms of credit. Promotion eligibility varies and is determined by WebBank. Taxes, shipping, and other charges are extra and vary. Payments equal 3% of your balance or $20, whichever is greater. Minimum Interest Charge is $2.00.

All products in your cart at the time of purchase will qualify for the special financing promotion if purchased with Dell Preferred Account between 11-26-2014 through 12/30/2014.

New MakerBot 3D printer hardware purchases are eligible! Refurbished and/or used purchases do not qualify for promotions. Eligible e-value/order codes: A7516721, A7629818, A7598495, A7617635.

Chat
What can we help you with today?
I want to chat with Sales.
I have a question about an existing order.
I have a technical question about my device.
Continue
Existing Orders
For faster service, enter your order number
(found in your confirmation e-mail)
Skip
Submit